Arizona Online Schools
Offer Numerous Elective Options

Hope High School Online is pleased to offer our online students a wide variety of elective options.  While not all Arizona online schools offer sports, we are pleased that our students can participate in sports through a collaborative relationship with Northwest Christian High School. We also have a number of clubs for our students, go on field trips, and have social outings as well.  We believe Arizona online schools can and should be fun!

Our students also enjoy the collaborative relationship we have with West-Mec, offering career training programs for high school students including architecture and construction, health sciences, and information technology. Arizona online schools like Hope High School can offer a safe, supportive learning environment with personalized attention and numerous elective options to help our students succeed in life!

electives-HHSO

Electives


Electives

How have African Americans shaped the culture of the United States throughout history? Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the slave trade through emancipation, and to the modern African diaspora, you will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In African American History, you’ll come face to face with individuals who changed the course of history and learn more about slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, and the many contributions of the African American community to American life. You will also explore how the history of African Americans influences current events today.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Now, more than ever, students are told they must be prepared for higher education or a career in a skilled profession. This course introduces students to a variety of educational and vocational opportunities and helps them identify which pathway will help them reach their goals. The content in this course provides instruction on skills essential for students preparing for college and/or a career, including: how to build an effective resume, how to groom and dress in the workplace, the power of networking and how to develop disciplines that lead to success.

Units in this course:

Important Life Skills

Life After High School

College and Career Preparation

Starting School and Getting the Job

Tools for Success

Personal Experience

This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration, to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques, and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Starting the Path to Creative Writing

Lesson 2: Finding Your Creative Light

Lesson 3: Fiction First

Lesson 4: A Fictional Place

Midterm

Unit 2Lesson 5: Speech in WritingLesson 6:When Truth Meets ImaginationLesson 7: Finding Your Inner PoetLesson 8: Revision and PurposeFinal Exam

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

In today’s world, crime and deviant behavior rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. In this course, we will study the field of Criminology – the study of crime. We will look at possible explanations for crime from the standpoint of psychological, biological and sociological perspectives, explore the categories and social consequences of crime, and investigate how the criminal justice system handles not only criminals, but also their misdeeds. Why do some individuals commit crimes why others do not?  What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors… from arrest to punishment…help shape the criminal case process?

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Developing Purpose is a course designed to increase a student’s success in school, at work, and in their personal life. Instead of starting with what we want to do and how we choose to accomplish it, this course helps students unearth the purpose: why do we want to do it. When we start with our purpose, we discover the underlying factors, beliefs, and values that motivate us and drive our lives–ultimately enhancing self-awareness and self-esteem. Upon completing this course, students will understand how to live with intention in everything they do, and how to experience more happiness and fulfillment in their lives.

Units in this course:

Happiness Vs. Success

Making a Difference

Thoughts, Words and Silence

Develop Yourself

Self-Esteem

Complete Health

From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century.  This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Gothica

Lesson 2: Frankenstein

Lesson 3: Frankenstein

Lesson 4: Jekyll and Hyde

Midterm
Unit 2

Lesson 5: Gothic Poetry

Lesson 6: Dracula

Lesson 7: Dracula

Lesson 8: Edgar Allan Poe

Final Exam

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi-disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: The Rise of Anti-Semitism

Lesson 2: Preparing for the “Final Solution”

Lesson 3: Confinement in the Camps

Lesson 4: The Wannsee Conference

Lesson 5: Life and Death in the Extermination Camps

Midterm

Lesson 6: Liberation and Recovery

Lesson 7: Non-Jewish Victims

Lesson 8: The Nuremberg Trials

Lesson 9: Coping in the Aftermath

Lesson 10: Genocide Convention

Final

Unit 2

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This in-depth course will examine the development of human systems, human understanding of the environment, and human social organization. The focus of this course is developing geographic skills by learning how to interpret maps, data and the comparison of geographic theories. This first half of the course will concentrate on the background of human geography, population and cultural variety. 

Units:

  • Introduction to Human and Physical Geography
  • Global Geography: Region One
  • Global Geography: Region Two 
  • Human Geography: Population
  • Human Geography: Culture

This in-depth course will examine the development of human systems, human understanding of the environment, and human social organization. The focus of this course is developing geographic skills by learning how to interpret maps, data and the comparison of geographic theories. This second half of the course will concentrate on the themes of political boundaries, land use, industrialization and economic development. 

Units:

  • Politics and Boundaries
  • Agriculture and Land Use
  • Industrialization and Economic Development
  • The Urban Environment, Land Use, and Economic Development

In this course students will learn what it takes to hone their leadership styles and develop personal qualities that will enhance their ability to grow and sustain healthy relationships. By using critical thinking, good decision making, and hard work, students will begin to find both success and significance. The course begins with providing students the opportunity to identify and write out their life vision, mission, and purpose and begin to understand the value of making memories, having adventures, and creating meaningful experiences. Upon completion of this course, students will have a clear understanding of what it takes to have an impact on their family, friends, and peers, as well as a personal action plan of practical steps they can take to reach their goals.

Units in this course:

Mission, Vision, Purpose

Strategic Planning

Relationships

Mindfulness

Identity

Transformation

This course will provide students with an aesthetic and historical perspective of music, covering a variety of styles and developments from the Middle Ages through the Twentieth First Century. Students will acquire basic knowledge and listening skills, making future music experiences more informed and satisfying.

The Elements of Music

Pop Music

Ancient and Medieval Music

Renaissance Music

Baroque Music

Classical Era Music

Romantic Era Music

Jazz

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.


Since the first people gathered around fires, mythology and folklore has been used as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still used to shape society today.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Introduction to Mythology and Folklore

Lesson 2: Warrior Women

Lesson 3: The Heroic Monomyth

Lesson 4: The Roles of Animals

Midterm

Lesson 5: The Social Significance

Lesson 6: Myths of the World

Lesson 7: Comparative Mythology

Lesson 8: Modern Myths and Legends

Final

Unit 2

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This course takes students through a comprehensive study of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students learn about worldwide views of nutrition, essential nutrient requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, weight management, healthy food choices, fitness, diet-related diseases and disorders, food handling, healthy cooking, nutrition for different populations, and more. Students gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious lifestyle

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

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This course examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. 

Unit 1: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

Unit 2: Nutrition and Physical Activity

Unit 3: Mental Health, Emotional Health, and Building Healthy Relationships

Unit 4: Personal and Community Health

This one-semester elective prepares students to navigate personal finance with confidence. The course opens with a study of what it means to be financially responsible, engaging students in budgeting, planning, and being a smart consumer. Students learn about the relationship between education, employment, income, and net worth, and they plan for the cost of college. Students then broaden their study to include banking, spending, investing, and other money management concepts before exploring credit and debt. In the final unit of the course, students study microeconomics and entrepreneurship, with an overview of economic systems, supply and demand, consumer behavior and incentives, and profit principles. The course concludes with an in-depth case study about starting a business.

Personal Finance covers concepts in…

Unit 1: Financial Responsibility and Budgeting

Unit 2: Relating Income and Careers Understanding

Unit 3: Managing Money

Unit 4: Credit and Debt Unit 5: Microeconomics and Entrepreneurship

This course will take you on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history!  Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters. For example, you’ll read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. You’ll learn about another eccentric who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As you learn about these great thinkers, you’ll come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western Civilization originated. You’ll also get a chance to ask yourself some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: The World of Wonder                          

Lesson 2: From Mythology to Philosophy            

Lesson 3: Socrates, Plato and Aristotle               

Lesson 4: Hellenistic Philosophy                          

Midterm   

Unit 2                                                             

Lesson 5: Christianity and Philosophy in the Middle Ages

Lesson 6: The Rise of Modern Western Philosophy

Lesson 7: Western Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century

Lesson 8: Western Philosophy in the Twentieth Century

Final

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

By participating in this course, students learn how to prevent, recognize, and identify different mental health issues; how to navigate the emotions involved; how to seek resources for help with mental health; and how to help others in need do the same. Students are challenged to reflect on and learn more about their inner selves and what they want out of their lives and relationships, as well as take the perspective of others into consideration to build better, healthier, and more supportive environments.

Units in this course:

Personal Wellness

Health and Safety

Living with Trauma

Mental Health Awareness and Assistance

Suicide Prevention

Relationship Support

The A Portion of this course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra ready. Students will review key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and be introduced to basic Algebra I work with appropriate support.

Pre-Algebra A 

Unit 1: Number Sense

Unit 2: Expressions, Equations and Inequalities

Unit 3: Ratios, Proportional Relationships, and Percents

Unit 4: Number Properties

Unit 5: Analytic Geometry

The B Portion of this course continues from Pre-Algebra A. This course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra ready. Students will review key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and be introduced to basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

Pre-Algebra B

Unit 1: Geometry Basics

Unit 2: Counting and Probability

Unit 3: Statistics, Square Roots and Right Triangles

Unit 4: Two-Dimensional Geometry

Unit 5: Three-Dimensional Geometry

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

Part A covers concepts in…                      

Unit 1:History, Perspectives, and Research

Unit 2: Psychological Research Methods   

Unit 3:Psychology and the Body: Biology, Sensation, Perception and Consciousness   

Unit 4: States of Consciousness                  

Unit 5: Altered States of Consciousness     

Unit 6: Being Human: The Nature of Human Experience                                      

Unit 7: Contemporary Theories of Learning

Unit 8: Memory                                             

Unit 9: Language and Problem Solving      

Unit 10: Intelligence  

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

Part B covers concepts in…

Unit 1:  Motivation, Emotion, Development

Unit 2: Human Growth and Development

Unit 3: Personality

Unit 4: Disorders: Classification and Treatment

Unit 5: Disorders

Unit 6: Social Psychology

Unit 7: Individual Interactions

Unit 8: Group Behaviors

Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. Learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent/ child relationships are some of the topics covered in this course. 

The World of Parenting

Self-Esteem and Child Development

Environments for Children

Positive Parenting

Parent-Child Relationships

The Diversity of Today’s Family Unit

Leadership and Organizational Skills

Trends and Science in Parenting

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Social and Emotional Wellness is a course designed to reinforce and empower a student’s overall mental health, especially in times of crisis or trauma. This course is designed to help students cope with difficult situations, self-soothe, and manage conflicting emotions. It seeks to give students the tools they need to keep their mind and well-being safe and sound.  Upon completing this course, students will understand how to utilize a framework for working through life challenges, enabling them to lead a meaningful and fulfilling life.

Units in this course:

Upgrade Yourself

Transforming Bullying

Social Impact

Barriers to Success

Redirecting my Life

Overcoming Adversity

Students will become aware of the challenges faced by social groups, as well as learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments and the individual.  Each unit is focused on a particular area of concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual will be examined. Students will not only learn more about how social problems affect them personally, but begin to develop the skills necessary to help make a difference in their own lives and communities, not to mention globally.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

The Social Problems II course continues to examine timely social issues affecting individuals and societies around the globe. Students learn about the overall structure of the social problem as well as how it impacts their lives. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. For each issue, students examine the connections in the global arena involving societies, governments and the individual.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.

Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students will trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course will also discuss some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examine the connections and influences they have.

Unit 1                                                               

Lesson 1: The Study of World Religions          

Lesson 2: Hinduism                                          

Lesson 3: Buddhism                                         

Lesson 4: Judaism                                           

Lesson 5: Christianity                                       

Midterm                                                            

Unit 2

Lesson 6: Islam

Lesson 7: Confucianism

Lesson 8: Shintoism

Lesson 9: Taoism

Lesson 10: Religion in the 21st Century

Final

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

 

Foreign Language


Foreign Language

This first semester will introduce you to vocabulary and simple sentences, so that you can start communicating right away. Importantly, you will explore Deaf culture: social beliefs, traditions, history, values and communities influenced by deafness. 
Semester A covers:

  • The Basics
  • Let’s Introduce Ourselves
  • Express Yourself: Feelings, Colors, and Questions
  • School is in Session

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This second semester will introduce you to more of this language and its grammatical structures. 
Semester 2 covers:

  • Who’s Who?
  • Well, It’s About Time
  • Taking the Stage by Storm!
  • Expanding Your Vocabulary

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

In this course, students will build on the skills they learned in American Sign Language 1 and explore the long and rich history of Deaf culture and language. They will expand their knowledge of the language as well as their understanding of the world in which it is frequently used. Students will grow their sign vocabulary and improve their ability to interact using facial expressions and body language. They will also learn current trends in technology within ASL as well as potential education and career opportunities. 
Semester A covers:

  • Describe It!
  • Getting Around Town
  • Emergency Situations
  • Fun Activities
  • Everyday Activities 

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

In this course, students will build on the skills they learned in American Sign Language 1 and explore the long and rich history of Deaf culture and language. They will expand their knowledge of the language as well as their understanding of the world in which it is frequently used. Students will grow their sign vocabulary and improve their ability to interact using facial expressions and body language. They will also learn current trends in technology within ASL as well as potential education and career opportunities.
Semester B covers:

  • Making Plans
  • What’s New?
  • Just A Story
  • Poetry in Motion
  • Get Outta Town

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.

Students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.

Students continue their introduction to French in this second-year, high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.

Students continue their introduction to French in this second-year, high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.

In this expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

In this expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

High school students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

High school students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Students continue their introduction to high school German in this second-year course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Students continue their introduction to high school German in this second-year course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

In this expanding engagement with Spanish, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

In this expanding engagement with Spanish, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

Health Education


Health Education

This course examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. 

Unit 1: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

Unit 2: Nutrition and Physical Activity

Unit 3: Mental Health, Emotional Health, and Building Healthy Relationships

Unit 4: Personal and Community Health

This 1.0 credit course examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, nutrition, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. 

Unit 1: Health and Wellness Basics

Unit 2: Health Maintenance

Unit 3: Healthy Behaviors

 

Technology


Technology Education

This first semester course of Computer Applications-Office introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and numerous hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office 2016 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft Office suite of applications: Word® and Excel®.

Unit 1: Word                                    

Unit 2: Tables and Charts               

Unit 3: Excel Basics                        

Unit 4: Using Excel: Functions

This second semester course of Computer Applications-Office introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and numerous hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office 2016 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft Office suite of applications: PowerPoint®, and Outlook®.

Unit 1: Outlook Basics

Unit 2:  Tools and Features of Outlook

Unit 3: PowerPoint Basics

Unit 4: Using Powerpoint: Charts and Tables

Fundamentals of Digital Media is a semester-long course that presents high school students an overview of the different types of digital media and how they are used in the world today. This course examines the impact that digital media has on culture and lifestyle. The course reviews the basic concepts for creating effective digital media and introduces several different career paths related to digital media. Students learn about the tools used as well as best practices employed for creating digital media. In the course, students explore topics such as the use of social media, digital media in advertising, digital media on the World Wide Web, digital media in business, gaming and simulations, e-commerce, and digital music and movies. Students also review the ethics and laws that impact digital media use or creation.

Keyboarding and Applications is a semester-long course that teaches students keyboarding skills, technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits. Students learn proper keyboarding techniques. Once students have been introduced to keyboarding skills, lessons include daily practice of those skills. Students gain an understanding of computer hardware, operating systems, file management, and the Internet. In addition, students apply their keyboarding skills and create a variety of business documents, including word processing documents and electronic presentations.

Required materials:

-Word-Processing Software (e.g., MS Word)

-Presentation Software (e.g., MS PowerPoint)

This first semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft® Office® 2010 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft User Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word® and Excel®, Students will be introduced to the basics of Outlook. 

Unit 1: Word Basics

Unit 2: Using Tables and Charts

Unit 3: Tools and Features of Word

Unit 4: Excel Basics

Unit 5:  Using Excel

Unit 6: Tools and Features of Excel

Unit 7: Outlook Basics

This first semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft® Office® 2010 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft User Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students are introduced to PowerPoint®, Outlook®, and Access®.By the end of both A and B courses, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.

Unit 1:Tools and Features of Outlook

Unit 2: PowerPoint Basics

Unit 3: Using PowerPoint

Unit 4: Tools and Features of PowerPoint

Unit 5: Access Basics

Unit 6: Using Access

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to online learning, including how to work independently, stay safe, and develop effective study habits in virtual learning environments. Featuring direct-instruction videos, interactive tasks, authentic projects, and rigorous assessments, the course prepares students for high school by providing in-depth instruction and practice in important study skills such as time management, effective note-taking, test preparation, and collaborating effectively online. 

Unit 1: Owning Your Academic Success

Unit 2: Learning Online

Unit 3: Reading and Note Taking

Unit 4: Researching Online

Unit 5: Writing and Presenting

Unit 6: Studying and Test Taking

 

Fine Arts / CTE


Fine Arts/CTE

What comes to mind when you think of marketing? Does a favorite commercial jingle begin to play in your head? Or do you recall the irritating phone call from a company trying to sell you software you already have? No matter what your feelings are about it, there’s no denying the sheer magnitude of the marketing industry. Every year companies spend $200 billion promoting their products and services—and that’s in the United States alone! Experts estimate that by the time you turn 65, you will have seen nearly 2 million TV commercials, not to mention radio ads, billboards, and online advertisements. You’re familiar with what it’s like on the receiving end of a company’s marketing efforts, but what’s it like on the other side? In this Advertising and Sales Promotions course, you’ll learn how marketing campaigns, ads, and commercials are conceived and brought to life. You’ll meet some of the creative men and women who produce those memorable ads and commercials. And you’ll discover career opportunities in the field to help you decide if a job in this exciting, fast-paced industry is in your future!

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

In this course, students will learn more about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources. Students will also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics, and world trade. 

Agriscience I covers the following concepts:

  • The Importance of Agriscience including the studies of farming
  • Agriscience and the Environment including the studies of what goes into the environment, forests and aquatic life, and getting power to the people
  • Plant Science including the studies of the anatomy of plants, soil basics, building professional skills (critical thinking)
  • The Animal Element including the studies of livestock in America, horses and cattle, and legal and ethical responsibilities
  • Animal Anatomy including the studies of internal anatomy, internal anatomy and sorting out genes
  • Technology and Agriscience including the studies of the food industry overview, preservatives and additives, and critiques of GMOs
  • Careers in Agriscience including the studies of going global with agriscience, biology and tractor basics
  • Agribusiness and Management including the studies of selling livestock and commodities exchange

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Science and technology are revolutionizing may areas of our lives, and agriculture is no exception! From aquaculture to genetic engineering, agriscience is finding new ways to better produce and manage plants, from the field to the garden. In Agriscience II, you’ll build on your existing knowledge of plant science and delve deeper into important areas such as soil science and weed management. 

Agriscience II covers the following concepts:

  • Introduction to Horticulture and Plant Science including the studies of defining horticulture, emerging technologies and workplace safety
  • Identifying and Classifying Plants including the studies of identifying plants, scientific classification, other ways to categorize plants, and hardness zones
  • Plant Growth, Propagation and Development including the studies of propagation vs reproduction, asexual propagation, sexual propagation and normal plant growth and development
  • Soil Science including the studies of soil texture, planting media and nutrients in the soil
  • Irrigation and Watering including the studies of the science of irrigation and watering, types of irrigation, and maintaining and repairing irrigation systems
  • Fertilization and Pest Management including the studies of integrated pest management, understanding fertilizer and safety and regulations for agriscience chemicals
  • Landscape Science including the studies of landscaping styles and maximizing water efficiency
  • Plant Management including the studies of transporting plant materials, harvesting plant materials and plant science in the future

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Animal Systems is a semester-long high school course that provides students with a wealth of information on livestock-management practices, animal husbandry, physiological systems, the latest scientific trends, veterinary practice, and innovations in food production. Changes in practices, regulations, and legislation for animal welfare continue as new research provides solutions to medical, ethical, and practical concerns. The course reviews current topics, such as advancements in technology and research, and defines areas of discussion while maintaining focus on best-management practices. A student might use the knowledge gained from the course to further an interest in becoming a chef, researcher, doctor, wildlife-management professional, or any number of applicable careers.

The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present and future, and in addition address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the anthropological world are just one of the powerful learning tools utilized in this course.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Anthropology has helped us better understand cultures around the world and through different time periods. This course continues the study of global cultures and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. We will examine some of the ways that cultures have understood and gave meaning to different stages of life and death. The course will also examine the creation of art within cultures and examine how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, we will apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course covers topics including early medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth-century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth-and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.

Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

Astronomy covers the following concepts:

  • The Earth Moon and Sun System systems including the studies of night and day cycles, lunar phases and eclipses
  • The Universe including the studies of cosmology, origin and fate of the universe
  • Stars including the studies of constellations, temperature and color, and death of a star
  • Galaxies including the studies of the milky way, evolution of galaxies and galaxies in motion
  • Inner Planets including the studies of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars
  • Outer Planets including the studies of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and their atmospheres
  • The Sun including the studies of the structure of the sun, solar flares, and solar eclipses
  • Comets, Asteroids and Meteors including the studies of where comets, asteroids and meteors come from

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Banking Services Careers is a semester-long high school course that provides an overview of how the banking system works, what the Federal Reserve is, and the technical and social skills needed to work in banking and related services. Students explore career paths and the required training or higher education necessary and gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions (e.g., setting up an account, processing a loan, establishing a business), cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course also discusses how technology has changed banking in the 21st century. The banking industry is responsible for many of the products that we use on a daily basis, from checking and savings accounts to debit cards, credit cards, and loans.

Can we bring back extinct species? Will the cures for cancer, malaria, and other diseases come from the combination of natural materials and new technologies? How is science changing the foods we eat? Welcome to the world of biotechnology! In this course, you will explore the history of biotechnology, including early attempts at food preservation, the development of antibiotics, and changes to food crops around the world. You’ll also learn more about some of the challenges of biotechnology, such as the growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and questions about the safety of commercially produced genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Finally, you’ll research new biotechnologies and how they are changing the world we live in.

Biotechnology covers the following concepts:

  • Biotechnology Basics including the studies of the cell, bacteria and viruses
  • The Beginning of Biotechnology including the studies of the start of biotechnology, the specifics of selective breeding and new farming technologies
  • Food Preservation and Fermentation including the studies of cool food storage, fermentation and cheese making
  • Collection and Breeding including the studies of hybridization, breeding and pollination
  • The Beginning of Genetics including the studies of Mendel’s experiment and building on Mendel’s work
  • Early Industrial Discoveries including the studies of pioneers in biotechnology and enzymes
  • The Discovery of Antibiotics including the studies of understanding bacteria and antibiotic resistance
  • Agricultural Biotechnology through the Green Revolution including the studies of new hybrids on the market, and the green revolution
  • Mapping the Human Genome including the studies of the goals of the human genome project and completing the sequence of the human genome
  • Modern Industrial Biotechnology including the studies of chemical production and industrial manufacturing
  • Modern Agricultural Biotechnology including the studies of genetic modification techniques and benefits of GMOs
  • Modern Pharmaceutical Biotechnology including the studies of gene therapy, cancer treatment and vaccines

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Career Explorations II is a semester-long course designed to give students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students learn about careers involving various technical fields from computers to agriculture. Each of the five units introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. These units include: Information Technology, Introduction to Information Support and Services, Introduction to Network Systems, Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, and Introduction to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). The goal is to whet students’ appetites for these careers.

Career Explorations I is a semester-long course designed to give students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students learn about careers involving human-related services. Each of the five units introduce one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. These units include: Career Management, Introduction to Careers in Health Sciences, Hospitality and Tourism Systems, Human Services, and Consumer Services. The goal is to whet students’ appetites for these careers.

Career Explorations III is a semester-long course designed to give students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students learn about careers from business to hands- on career paths. Each of the five unit introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. These units include: Introduction to Business and Finance, Introduction to Manufacturing, Introduction to Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics, Introduction to Architecture and Construction, and Introduction to Marketing. The goal is to whet students’ appetites for these careers.

Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, and develop the skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce. This course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a résumé that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.

Unit 1: Introduction to Work

Unit 2: Performing a Self-Assessment

Unit 3: Investigating Career Opportunities

Unit 4: The Job Search Process

Unit 5: Writing a Professional Résumé

Unit 6: Writing a Cover Letter

Unit 7: Developing Interview Skills

Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This course helps students explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. 

Unit 1: Starting a New Job

Unit 2: Working With Others

Unit 3: Workplace Ethics and Legalities

Unit 4: Improving Your Professional Skills

Unit 5: Technology and Time Management

Unit 6: Taking Control of Your Career

Unit 7: Your Evolving Career

The criminal justice system offers a wide range of career opportunities. In this course, students will explore different areas of the criminal justice system, including the trial process, the juvenile justice system, and the correctional system.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Careers in Logistics Planning and Management Services is a semester- long course that provides high school students with the history of logistics and recent advances in the field. Units include supply chain management, inventory and transportation management, and safety in the workplace. Logistics is a high-growth industry and stable career choice. There is something for every career-seeker, ability, and experience level. The objectives of this course are to introduce the student to the field of logistics planning and management and to explain the career opportunities that are available in this field.

Marketing research is the foundation of all marketing activities because it provides the data needed to make key strategic decisions about products, promotions, pricing, and other key organizational decisions. Careers in Marketing Research is a semester-long high school course that provides information about the process of investigation and problem analysis by using research to produce key marketing statistics that are communicated to management and used throughout the organization. This course concludes with the execution, interpretation, and presentation of marketing research.

Construction Careers is a semester-long course that introduces high school students to the basics of construction, building systems, engineering principles, urban planning, and sustainability. Students learn the key techniques in building all types of buildings, as well as the key individuals involved in each step of the process. Many lessons present information on green building techniques and concepts that are becoming a standard part of the construction industry. Safety practices are emphasized in several lessons because construction is one of the most dangerous industries; students learn that there is no way to be successful in construction without taking such issues seriously. Lessons in this course also explore regulatory agencies and guidelines established for protecting not only construction workers but also the occupants of a building.

Corrections is one of the three branches of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) in the United States. All three branches employ personnel who are authorized to uphold and enforce the law and are required to operate under the rule of law. Each branch works as part of the entire system to maintain the public safety and well-being and bring criminals to justice. Corrections facilities and programs are run by a complex system of policies and procedures, which uphold local, state, and federal laws. Corrections: Policies and Procedures gives high school students an introductory, yet thorough view of many aspects of corrections operations. Students receive historical and legal background information as they study how prisons and prisoners have evolved into correctional facilities and programs for offenders. In this semester-long course duties, responsibilities, conduct, training, and special certification possibilities for corrections staff are explored. Many aspects of procedures in corrections are reviewed, giving students an in-depth look at what a variety of careers in this growing field encompass and require.

Have you ever wondered how photographers take such great pictures? Have you tried to take photographs and wondered why they didn’t seem to capture that moment that you saw with your eyes? The Digital Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students will use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, close-up, and action photographs.

Required materials: 

  •  Manual camera or digital camera with manual settings (the camera needs to allow for the mode, shutter speed, and aperture to be adjusted) A Smartphone may be used for most required tasks, however, appropriate applications will need to be installed to allow the student to make the necessary adjustments to the camera mode, shutter speed, and aperture. 
  • Image editing software
  •  Reflector (white paper, poster board,sheets, or a wall)  
  •  Access to a slideshow application, such as PowerPoint

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Introduction to Photography

Lesson 2: The History of Photography

Lesson 3: Aperture and Shutter Speed

Lesson 4: Elements of Composition

Lesson 5: Lighting

Midterm

Unit 2

Lesson 6: Special Techniques

Lesson 7: People

Lesson 8: Landscapes and Places

Lesson 9: Documentary and Action

Lesson 10: Putting the Pieces Together

Final

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

In this course, we will examine various aspects of professional photography, including the ethics of the profession, and examine some of the areas that professional photographers may choose to specialize in, such as wedding photography and product photography. We will learn how to critique photographs in order to better understand what creates an eye catching photograph. 

Required materials: 

  •  Digital camera: “point and shoot” or above. A Smartphone may be used for most required tasks, however, appropriate applications will need to be installed to allow the student to make the necessary adjustments to the camera mode, shutter speed, and aperture. 
  • One frame (of your choice) to display a photograph on the wall 
  • 3M strip (or something similar) 
  •  Image editing software capable of the following: 

-cropping 

– changing a photo to black and white 

– adjusting color and brightness 

– resizing images 

– applying filters and special effects like texture or glitter 

– creating layers 

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Photography as a Career

Lesson 2: Legal and Ethical Concerns

Lesson 3: Photographers and Critiques

Lesson 4: Photography Software

Midterm

Unit 2

Lesson 5: The Darkroom

Lesson 6: Art, Product, and Stock Photography

Lesson 7: Photojournalism

Lesson 8: Wedding Photography

Final

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Want to have an impact on the most important years of human development?  Students will learn how to create fun and educational environments for children, how to keep the environment safe for children, and how to encourage the health and well-being of infants, toddlers, and school-aged children.

Childcare Roles and Obligations

A Clean, Safe and Healthy Childcare Environment

Food and Nutrition

Rules and Regulations

Early Childhood Development

Play: A Child’s Work

Guidance and Discipline

Communication, Observation and Recording

Literacy and Language

Personal Goals and Development

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.


Family and Community Services is a high school semester-long course that introduces applications within professions related to family and community services. Students identify degree and credential requirements for occupations in this pathway and identify individual, social, historical, economic, and cultural context to increase awareness of family and community services. Students develop the abilities necessary to evaluate and identify a range of effective communication strategies and skills for establishing a collaborative relationship with others. Students also complete a variety of projects to apply their skills and knowledge. Units are divided among career fields: Social Workers, Emergency Management and Planners, Therapists and Treatment Specialists, Education and Childcare.

Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI).  Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.

Forensics Science I covers the following concepts:

  • Introduction to Forensic Sciences including the studies of the history of forensic science, and forensics and the legal system
  • The Crime Scene including the studies of the crime scene, recording evidence, and evidence
  • Physical Evidence including the studies of physical evidence, types of evidence and soil
  • Physical Evidence: Hair, Blood and Fingerprints including the studies of hair, blood and fingerprints
  • Firearms and Tool Marks including the studies of self defense vs murder, and collecting and preserving firearm evidence
  • Human Remains including the studies of the time of death, and human remains at the crime scene
  • DNA Evidence including the studies of collecting and preserving DNA evidence, and technique used for DNA typing
  • Arson and Explosion Evidence including the studies of forensic science and the fire scene, and explosives

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

Forensic Sciences II covers the following concepts:

  • Drug Evidence including the studies of drug samples and collecting drug evidence, and drug evidence testing
  • Forensic Toxicology including the studies of  types of poisons and detecting poisons
  • Forgeries and Document Examination including the studies of comparing handwriting, altered documents, ink and paper
  • Plant, Soil and Trace Evidence including the studies of paint, fibers and analyzing fibers
  • Forensic Entomology including the studies of blowflies and human remain
  • Forensic Anthropology including the studies of the bones and facial reconstruction
  • Digital Evidence including the studies of device basics, latent data and slack space
  • Computers and the Future of Digital Evidence including the studies of databases, facial recognition, E-fit and Suspect Images

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Forests and other natural resources play an important role in our world, from providing lumber and paper products to providing habitat for birds and animals. In the Introduction to Forestry and Natural Resources course, you’ll learn more about forest ecology, management, and conservation. You’ll explore topics such as environmental policy, land use, water resources, and wildlife management. Finally, you’ll learn more about forestry related careers and important issues facing forestry professionals today.

Required Materials:

        ƒ A digital camera or camera phone 

        ƒ Approximately 1 cup of soil 

        ƒ A clear glass jar with a lid 

        ƒ Water to fill the jar 

        ƒ A ruler or tape measure 

        ƒ Marker or tape 

        ƒ Supplies for an experiment of the student’s choice 

        ƒ Samples of water from three different water sources 

        ƒ 3 clear glass containers with lid

Forestry covers the following concepts: 

  • What is Forestry including the studies of why forests matter, and the goals of forestry
  • All About Ecosystems including the studies of the wolves of Yellowstone, and taking care of forests
  • Measuring and Monitoring the Forests including the studies of tracking trees, watching the forests grow
  • Forest Management including the studies of fighting wildfires, and fire prevention
  • Working with Wood including the studies of the lumber industry today, and technology in the forest
  • Getting the Lay of the Land including the studies of maps and mapping, and navigation basics
  • Ethics, Ecology and Safety including the studies of government agencies role in monitoring forestry, and safety in the forest
  • Professional Skills including the studies of forestry careers, and prepping for the job

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.
Semester A covers:

  • The Human Body and Genetics
  • Cells
  • Tissues, Organs, and Systems
  • Disease and Disorders
  • Anatomy of the Body
  • Musculoskeletal System

This course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.
Semester B covers:

  • Nervous and Sensory Systems
  • Cardiovascular System
  • Respiratory System
  • Integumentary, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems
  • Digestive, Urinary, and Endocrine Systems 
  • Human Reproduction and Development

Health, Safety, and Ethics in the Health Environment is a semester-long high school course that focuses on healthcare safety, health maintenance practices, environmental safety processes and procedures, and ethical and legal responsibilities. It also reinforces, expands, and enhances biology content specific to diseases and disorders. Students participate in project- and problem-based healthcare practices and procedures to demonstrate the criticality of these knowledge and skills. Students develop basic technical skills required for all health career specialties including understanding occupational safety techniques and obtaining their CPR and First Aid certifications.

This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Students will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

Unit 1

Lesson 1: Intro. to Hospitality and Tourism

Lesson 2: Careers

Lesson 3: Hotels

Lesson 4: Restaurants and Food Service

Midterm
Unit 2

Lesson 5: Travel Planning

Lesson 6: Event Planning

Lesson 7: Theme Parks and Recreation

Lesson 8: Cruise Ships and Resorts

Final Exam

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

From geography to culture Global Business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course is designed to help students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace. It takes a global view on business, investigating why and how companies go international and are more interconnected. The course further provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations will all be explored in this course. Students will cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in both business activities and the 21st century.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This first semester introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐ paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.

Unit 1: Economics

Unit 2:Cost and Profit

Unit 3:Business Types

Unit 4: Money Management

Unit 5: Taxes and Credit

Unit 6: Business Finance

Unit 7: Business and Society

Unit 8: Business Planning

Unit 9: Marketing

Unit 10: Promotion

In this second semester introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐ paced business environment. This course covers selling and pricing, customers, inventory, and safety as well as workplace skills and career development. Students are introduced to word processing, presentations,  and working with data and events.

Unit 1: Selling and Pricing

Unit 2: Customers, Inventory, and Safety

Unit 3: Workplace Skills

Unit 4: Career Development

Unit 5: Using the Internet

Unit 6: Word Processing

Unit 7: Presentations

Unit 8: Working with Data and Events

This high school course introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers, as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the health care field.
Semester A covers:

  • Health Science Pathways and Careers
  • Persuing Health Science Careers
  • Ethics and the Law
  • Healthcare Systems
  • Patient Care
  • Health and Wellness

This high school course introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers, as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the health care field.
Semester B covers:

  • Safety in the Workplace
  • First Aide
  • Communication, Leadership, and Teamwork
  • Health Science Career Skills
  • Technology in Health Science

If you’re the first to post on Facebook or Instagram about your favorite TV shows

or favorite celebrities, then you’re just the person that every online, in-print, and broadcast news outlet is looking for. And Journalism: Investigating the Truth is the perfect course for you! In this course, you’ll learn how to write a lead that grabs your readers, how to write engaging news stories and features, and how to interview sources. You’ll also learn about the history of journalism, how to succeed in the world of social media news, and how to turn your writing, photography, and people skills into an exciting and rewarding career.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.


Every society has laws that its citizens must follow. From traffic laws to regulations on how the government operates, laws help provide society with order and structure. Our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal expectations. Consumer laws help protect us from faulty goods; criminal laws help to protect society from individuals who harm others; and family law handles the arrangements and issues that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. This course focuses on the creation and application of laws in various areas of society. By understanding the workings of our court system, as well as how laws are actually carried out, we become more informed and responsible citizens in our communities and of our nation.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Legal Services is a high school semester-long course that provides students with an overview of the system of laws in the United States, the practice areas, and career options in the field. Students learn about how the legal system operates, the consequences to those who commit crimes, and how disputes are settled, as well as how criminal and civil cases reach court and are resolved. Students learn about the courtroom and the basics of a typical court case. Students explore constitutional rights and legal safeguards, types of evidence, as well as how technology has changed the practice of law. They also learn about legal education and various careers in the legal field.

Have you wondered about the secrets of the deep and how the creatures below the ocean’s surface live and thrive? Understand more about the aquatic cycles, structures, and processes that generate and sustain life in the sea.

Marine Science covers the following concepts:

  • Water and the Environment including the studies of the geography of science and ocean currents
  • Tides including the studies of the changing tides and exploring ecosystems
  • Water and Weather including the studies of gases in the ocean, acidity in the ocean
  • Energy in the Ocean including the studies of understanding fluid dynamics, and all about waves
  • The Ocean and It’s Population including the studies of the layers of the ocean, and monitoring population
  • Populations that Thrive including the studies of living together, and threats to populations
  • Human Interaction and the Environment including the studies of problems with pollution, and keeping the environment intact
  • The Past Present and Future of Marine Science including the studies of the beginnings of marine biology and ethics in the ocean
  • Careers in Marine Science including the studies of technology and marine science, and problem solving in marine science

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to health care settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course provide students entering the health care field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments.
Semester A covers:

  • Medical Terminology
  • Medical Abbreviations
  • Pharmaceutical Terms
  • Anatomical and Physiological Terms

This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to health care settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course provide students entering the health care field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments.
Semester B covers:
     – Body Systems Terms I     – Body Systems Terms II     – Body Systems Terms III

Most of us have seen a war movie; maybe it had a hotshot aviator or a renegade private or a daring Special Forces operative. But outside of these sensationalized portrayals, do you really understand how the military works or what it can do for you? The military offers far more career diversity than most people imagine, and Introduction to Military Careers will provide the information you need to gain a broader understanding of how to find the right fit. You will learn about the five military branches— Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines Corps, and Navy—and examine which jobs you might like to pursue. From aviation, to medicine, to law enforcement, the military can be an outstanding place to achieve your dreams in a supportive and well-structured environment. (This is a one-semester course)

Military Careers covers concepts in…

Unit 1: Welcome to the Military

Unit 2: Military Aviation Careers

Unit 3: Logistics, Supply, and Transportation Careers in the Military

Unit 4: Law and Order in a Uniform

Unit 5: Midterm

Unit 6: Boots on the Ground: Combat Operations Careers

Unit 7: Military Brains: Technology, Engineering, Intelligence

Unit 8: Military Behind the Scenes

Unit 9: Private Practice or General Practice?: Military Medical Services

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.


This course prepares students to provide and assist with all aspects of activities of daily living and medical care for the adult patient in hospital, long-term care, and home settings. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students are taught the basics of nurse assisting, including interpersonal skills, medical terminology and procedures, legal and ethical responsibilities, safe and efficient work, gerontology, nutrition, emergency skills, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course from an approved program prepares the student for state certification for employment as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA).

Semester A covers:

  • Nurse Assisting
  • Legal and Ethical Aspects
  • Physiologic Aspects
  • Psychosocial Aspects
  • Infections and Infection Control
  • Safety and Emergencies

This course prepares students to provide and assist with all aspects of activities of daily living and medical care for the adult patient in hospital, long-term care, and home settings. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students are taught the basics of nurse assisting, including interpersonal skills, medical terminology and procedures, legal and ethical responsibilities, safe and efficient work, gerontology, nutrition, emergency skills, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course from an approved program prepares the student for state certification for employment as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA).
Semester B covers:

  • Communication
  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Mobility and Positioning
  • Common Procedures
  • Optional Procedures



Nursing: Unlimited Possibilities and Unlimited Potential provides high school students opportunities to compare and contrast the various academic and clinical training pathways to an entry- level position in nursing and to explore the growing number of opportunities for professional advancement given the proper preparation and experience. In this semester-long course, students have several opportunities to learn about the expanding scope of professional practice for registered nurses and better understand the important changes proposed in the education and ongoing professional development of nurses.

Personal Care Services introduces high school students to a variety of careers in the following areas: cosmetology (including hairstyling and haircutting, esthetics, manicuring, makeup, and teaching) and barbering (including cutting and styling of hair and facial hair and manicuring for men); massage therapy, teaching body-mind disciplines (yoga, Pilates, and the martial arts), and fitness (general exercise classes and acting as a personal trainer); and mortuary science (embalming and funeral directing). The semester-long course teaches students about what each career entails and the education and training they need to become credentialed in various career specialties. In addition, about half of the course is devoted to teaching knowledge associated with the various professions, so that students can get a feel for what they should learn and whether they would like to learn it.

This course prepares students for employment as a Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) and covers the skills needed for the pharmacy technician field. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn the basics of pharmacy assisting, including various pharmacy calculations and measurements, pharmacy law, pharmacology, medical terminology and abbreviations, medicinal drugs, sterile techniques, USP 795 and 797 standards, maintenance of inventory, patient record systems, data processing automation in the pharmacy, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for national certification for employment as a CPhT.

Semester A covers:

  • Pharmacy Technician Roles
  • Pharmacy Environments
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug and Body Systems Part I
  • Drug and Body Systems Part II
  • Drug Classifications



This course prepares students for employment as a Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) and covers the skills needed for the pharmacy technician field. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn the basics of pharmacy assisting, including various pharmacy calculations and measurements, pharmacy law, pharmacology, medical terminology and abbreviations, medicinal drugs, sterile techniques, USP 795 and 797 standards, maintenance of inventory, patient record systems, data processing automation in the pharmacy, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for national certification for employment as a CPhT.

Semester B covers:

  • Prescriptions
  • Calculations, Routes, and Formulations
  • Parenterals and Admixtures 
  • Compounding
  • Pharmacy Law
  • Inventory Management
  • Pharmacy Management



Physicians, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, and Other Doctors focuses on preparation for physician-level careers, including dental, veterinary and pharmaceutical, along with a look into the physician assistant and alternative medicine systems. This semester-long course also introduces the topics of diversity and the move toward social and cultural skills in medicine, in addition to academic ability. This course focuses on the preparation for entry to practice, along with navigating the field once you are in it (working as part of a team, dealing with patients, etc.). Students choose their career path by studying different roles, responsibilities, settings, education needs, and amounts of patient contact. Degree and training requirements, working environment, salaries, and the day in the life of that career is also covered in this course. Students explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire health field, such as behaving ethically, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, and following laws and policies.

Planning Meetings and Special Events is a semester-long high school course designed as an introduction to the study of planning meetings and special events. Being a meetings and special events planner is both demanding and rewarding. According to The Bureau of Labor Statistics employment of meeting, convention, and event planners is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be best for candidates with hospitality experience and a bachelor’s degree in meeting and event management, hospitality, or tourism management. It’s not all fun and parties because a meeting coordinator is responsible for every detail of an event. Planners must know how to communicate, be empathetic, and think of their clients. It’s crucial to remember that in some instances the event will be a once-in-a-lifetime occasion, so it’s important to get it right.

Plant Systems is a semester-length high school course that introduces students to the basics of plant biology, soil science, agriculture, and horticulture, along with the environmental management practices involved in each, including integrated pest management, biotechnology, growth techniques, and crop management. Students learn the basic parts of a plant, how plants are scientifically classified, and how they interact with water, air, nutrients, and light to undergo the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Plant reproduction, including pollination, germination, and dispersal of seeds, is also presented. The course concludes by looking at careers in the plant sciences which includes agronomy, horticulture, or landscape design.

Food has to travel from the farm to the table, and in Agriculture and Natural Resources, you will learn about all of the steps in that journey, beginning with the history of agriculture through animal husbandry, plant science, and managing our use of natural resources. In this course, you will receive a broad understanding of the subject matter, preparing you for future hands-on learning, participation in Future Farmers of America, and supervised agricultural experiences. 

Required Materials: 

  • A digital camera or camera phone
  • Ingredients and tools to make a simple food dish of the student’s choice 
  • Stove/grill/oven/microwave

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Have you ever wondered who decides where to put roads? Or makes sure that someone answers the phone when you call 911? Or determines that a new drug is safe for the public? These tasks and many more are part of public service, a field that focuses on building healthy societies. Public service includes many different types of careers, but they all have in common the goal of working for others. This course will explore some of the most common career paths in public service. Working for the public also comes with a very specific set of expectations since protecting society is such an important mission. So if you want to work for the greater good, there is probably a public service career for you!

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Public Health: Discovering the Big Picture in Health Care is a semester-long high school course that discusses the multiple definitions of public health and the ways these definitions are put into practice. The five core disciplines and ways they interact to reduce disease, injury and death in populations is explored. By understanding the roles of public health, students gain a greater appreciation for its importance and the various occupations one could pursue within the field of public health. Students explore the history, nature and context of the public health system. Students also learn how to promote public health, and how to coordinate a response to a public health emergency. Students explore how diseases spread and learn about the roles of the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization. By entering the field of public health, students play an integral part in improving the health and lives of many people.

Science and Mathematics in the Real World is a semester-long high school course where students focus on how to apply scientific and mathematical concepts to the development of plans, processes, and projects that address real world problems, including sustainability and “green” technologies. This course also highlights how science, mathematics, and the applications of STEM will be impacted due to the development of a greener economy. This course exposes students to a wide variety of STEM applications and to real world problems from the natural sciences, technology fields, the world of sports, and emphasizes the diversity of STEM career paths. The importance of math, critical thinking, and mastering scientific and technological skill sets is highlighted throughout. Challenging and enjoyable activities provide multiple opportunities to develop critical thinking skills and the application of the scientific method, and to work on real world problems using STEM approaches.

Scientific Discovery and Development is a semester-long high school course that explores the history of clinical laboratory science, learning how clinical laboratories evolved and became professionalized, and how scientific discoveries and breakthroughs fueled the development of the laboratory while the sub-disciplines in biology were advancing. Students learn about the circulatory system and about microbiology and the subfields within it. Cells and tissues, cell division and basic genetics is also addressed. This course covers the three major areas in bioresearch: biotechnology, nanotechnology, and pharmaceutical research and development. More than two dozen career fields are explored along the way including laboratory techs, phlebotomists, and pathologist assistants. Students learn what is necessary in the areas of education and credentialing with an idea of the job outlook and salaries.

Scientific Research is a semester-long high school course that describes activities from the point of view of a professional scientist. The lessons provide support, accessible ideas, and specific language that guide students through most of the steps, insights, and experiences eventually faced if continued through higher education toward a graduate degree. Knowing the practical, everyday basics of scientific thinking and laboratory activity serves as a necessary first step to a career as a technician or a lab assistant. While these jobs are hands-on and technical, the intellectual and historical background covered in the course provides an awareness that is essential to working in such an atmosphere.

This semester is the first half of a full-year course designed to provide the skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create, manage and own a business, while exposing students to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, students explore what kinds of opportunities exist for small business entrepreneurs and become aware of the necessary skills for running a business. Students become familiar with the traits and characteristics that are found in successful entrepreneurs, and see how research, planning, operations, and regulations can affect small businesses. Students also learn how to develop plans for having effective business management, financing and marketing strategies.

Unit 1: Overview of Small Business Entrepreneurship

Unit 2: Economics

Unit 3: Financing

This semester is the second hald of a full-year course designed to provide the skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create, manage and own a business, while exposing students to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, students explore what kinds of opportunities exist for small business entrepreneurs and become aware of the necessary skills for running a business. Students become familiar with the traits and characteristics that are found in successful entrepreneurs, and see how research, planning, operations, and regulations can affect small businesses. Students also learn how to develop plans for having effective business management, financing and marketing strategies.

Unit 1: Marketing

Unit 2: Management and Business Plans

Have you ever wished to play sports professionally? Have you dreamed of one day becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer? If you answered yes to either question, then believe it or not, you’ve been fantasizing about entering the exciting world of sports and entertainment marketing. Although this particular form of marketing bears some resemblance to traditional marketing, there are many differences as well—including a lot more glitz and glamour! In this course, you’ll have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. You’ll learn about how professional athletes, sports teams, and well known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become billionaires as a result. If you’ve ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event such as the Super Bowl or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, then this course will introduce you to the fundamentals of such a career.

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are active components in the real world. STEM and Problem Solving is a semester-long high school course that outlines how to apply the concepts and principles of scientific inquiry, encouraging the use of problem-solving and critical-thinking skills to produce viable solutions to problems. Students learn the scientific method, how to use analytical tools and techniques, how to construct tests and evaluate data, and how to review and understand statistical information. This course is designed to help students understand what we mean by problem solving and to help understand and develop skills and techniques to create solutions to problems. Advanced problem-solving skills are necessary in all science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines and career paths. This problem-solving course stresses analytic skills to properly format problem statements, use of the scientific method to investigate problems, the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches to construct tests, and an introduction to reviewing and interpreting statistical information.

Teaching and Training Careers is a semester-long high school course that introduces students to the art and science of teaching. It provides a thorough exploration of pedagogy, curriculum, standards and practices, and the psychological factors shown by research to affect learners. In five units of study, lessons, and projects, students engage with the material through in-depth exploration and hands-on learning, to prepare them for teaching and training careers. Students are given many opportunities to be the teacher or trainer, and to explore the tasks, requirements, teaching strategies, and research- based methods that are effective and high-quality.

Therapeutics: The Art of Restoring and Maintaining Wellness is a semester-long high school course that focuses on careers that help restore and maintain mobility and physical and mental health, such as physical therapists, physical therapy assistants, occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, dieticians and dietetic technicians, art therapists, neurotherapists, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and registered dental hygienists. Each career is explored in depth, examining typical job duties, educational and licensure requirements, working conditions, average salary, and job outlook. Key concepts and specific skill sets are introduced in the lessons, allowing students to apply what they have learned to health careers. This course is important because skilled health care workers are in high demand and expected to remain so for the foreseeable future.

As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

Veterinary Science covers the following concepts:

  • Introduction to Veterinary Science including the studies of veterinary science and health, education and training, and ethics
  • Small Animal Medicine including the studies of skeletal and muscle disorders and infectious diseases
  • Large Animal Medicine including the studies of horses, cattle and swine
  • Exotic Animal Medicine including the studies of avian medicine, reptiles and zoo animals
  • Poisoning and Toxicology including the studies of exposure to toxins, snakebites and cyanide poisoning
  • Veterinary Parasitology including the studies of giardia, mites and fleas
  • Zoonotic Diseases including the studies of hantavirus, plague and anthrax
  • Holistic Veterinary Science and Medicine including the studies of acupuncture, herbal and botanical remedies and essential oils

* This course requires you to prove your ability to adhere to the expectations of HHSO prior to being enrolled into it. Therefore, coach approval is required.

The first semester of Visual Arts focuses on artistic techniques as well as two-dimensional art and three dimensional media and architecture.  Students will analyze how art is used to express commemoration, documentation, and narration. This is an on hands class where students will be painting a landscape, creating a still-life drawing, creating a relief print as well as an assemblage. Materials needed for this course:  paint (acrylic, watercolors, oils, tempera, or other paints of your choice), paintbrushes, sponges, digital camera, camera phone or scanner, variety of found objects and materials that can be recycled (old newspapers, soda cans, wire, cloth, feathers, old bike gears, etc.) Glue, tape, string, or other adhesives.

Unit 1: Introduction to Art

Unit 2:Artistic Techniques and the Language of Art

Unit 3:Art Appreciation: Two-Dimensional Art

Unit 4: Three-Dimensional Media and Architecture

Unit 5: Prehistoric Art and Ancient Art: Art in Ancient Civilizations

The second semester of Visual Arts focuses on World Arts before 1400 as well as art in the Middle Ages and Early Europe. The components include the High Renaissance and Baroque Art, 15th and 16th Century Art In Europe, Art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific Cultures. This course will also cover the characteristics of Modern Art in America as well as Latin America. 

Unit 1: Art History- World Arts Before 1400

Unit 2: Art in the Middle Ages and Early Europe

Unit 3:The Renaissance Period- 15th and 16th Century Art in Europe

Unit 4: The High Renaissance and Baroque Art

Unit 5: Art of Asia Africa, the Americans, and the Pacific Cultures

Unit 6: 18th and 19th Century Art Movements in Europe and the Americas

Unit 7: Modern Art Movements in Europe and the Americas

Workplace Experience courses provide students with work experience in a field related to their interests. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and employer (although students are not necessarily paid). These courses may include classroom activities as well, involving further study of the field or discussion regarding experiences that students encounter in the workplace.

Students may earn .5 credit per semester while working. Students must work a minimum of 90 hours, provide the facilitator (teacher) with pay stubs or employer proof of work hours each pay period, must complete an application for employment, receive an employer review or feedback, and maintain employment throughout the semester.